That same old beach @ Carrickalinga Sthn Fleurieu SA
That same old beach @ Carrickalinga Sthn Fleurieu SA
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David Muirhead Great beach,often listed in Australia's best beaches guides for clear water white sand safe swimming and snorkeling and near the heritage listed Normanville Dunes and about an hour's drive from Adelaide (capital city of South Australia )
Why we rarely wear bow ties snklng (NB; not a pipie just detritus,and bow tie=Amphibolis)
Why we rarely wear bow ties snklng (NB; not a pipie just detritus,and bow tie=Amphibolis)

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David Muirhead Carrickalinga south beach half in half out looking south later in afternoon Dave
David Muirhead Another rather similar and perhaps for some viewers boringly bland image taken in knee deep water using a 10mm lens in optical glass dome port housing.Easy to do but not so easy to find a lovely location like this Carrickalinga beach,which is a cinch here in SA but would be overcrowded to point of ruin if it was located in most other parts of the world.
Again, not pipies but you gotta look anyway…
Again, not pipies but you gotta look anyway…
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‘Westward Ho’; Ckga Sth Bch
‘Westward Ho’; Ckga Sth Bch

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David Muirhead How many times must I say and say with factually accurate passion and desperate desire to educate the public? This beach and this bay (Yankalilla Bay) are right up there with the worlds best biodiversity gems. Truth is,I'm beginning to think,the first casualty of ecological sciences infernally blighted relationship with political figures,policy,critical thinking,and the underwhelmingly overt truism of our time:where there is money to be had,it is never spent on any species...(to be continued..)
David Muirhead ...(cont)..unless it is one the public know about and like e.g. koalas and pandas,is that increasingly uncommon attribute 'Common sense '.Common sense tells us that failure to protect and manage sustainably entire ecosystems is the priority for this time,yet that concept seems yet to be assimilated by the majority of people when looking at whole communities.
Creation witnessed, vs I forgot to push ‘red eye’ knob
Creation witnessed, vs I forgot to push ‘red eye’ knob
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Shark patrol fixed wing aircraft heads nth past Normanville jetty 16-12-2013
Shark patrol fixed wing aircraft heads nth past Normanville jetty 16-12-2013
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David Muirhead Uninspiring image,but for the record the Normanville north dunes are only about 50 meters from the photographer however they are largely obscured in this image by a mix of self set local provenance river red gum trees and some planted trees and shrubs.The dunes here are about 100 meters wide after which you reach the beach just north of the jetty and the aircraft in the picture is only a small single engine Cessna or similar so it too is hard to discern against the blue skies
Our shack seen from across Ronald St 16-12-2013
Our shack seen from across Ronald St 16-12-2013
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Normanville Beach about 200m north of jetty 16-12-2013
Normanville Beach about 200m north of jetty 16-12-2013
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David Muirhead Yankalilla Bay has normanville as its centre point and when the water is clear as in the image,you can easily see the patches of mostly limestone rocky reefs which are scattered throughout the bay by kneeling on the bow of a small to medium sized trailer boat and peering into the depths.And most of the bay is quite shallow,for example even several kilometers out from the Normanville jetty depths are in the 10 to 15 meters range.Overall sea grass beds dominate but the patches of medium relief reef make excellent dive sites.
‘Hotspot’ seen from dunes just nth of jetty Normanville16-12-2013
‘Hotspot’ seen from dunes just nth of jetty Normanville16-12-2013
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David Muirhead By Hotspot I mean that quite small area of inshore sub tidal sandy and grassy bottom immediately to the north of and just out from the tiny jetty remnant.This is the best area I have ever encountered (and I have never heard of any equivalent site globally either but of course I could be wrong) for both species diversity and endemism among the Syngnathidae.And all the 18 or so species known to occur here are found in depths of not more than 5 meters but generally between 2 and 4 meters,and within an easy swim from the nice white sand beach and with car parking next to jetty and even fresh water shower (recycled water not potable)for rinsing gear after dive.
A view of Ronald St Normanville 16-12-13
A view of Ronald St Normanville 16-12-13
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Worm (NB; is Not E.laticeps) Edithburgh SA
Worm (NB; is Not E.laticeps) Edithburgh SA
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David Muirhead This is a VERY big marine worm,capable of very painful venomous bite,and more often seen by divers at night when foraging actively but on this day it was quite heavily overcast,rather late afternoon,and worm was in some sort of struggle/distress/??being attacked from below substrate by octopus??(guesswork....I cld not see even one occy's arm,but I'm also sure the brittle star present is an incidental critter wrt 'episode' for worm)
David Muirhead PS:worm's length can be roughly assesses based on the paddleweed(Halophila sp. seagrass) also present....Hmmm...
David Muirhead I've reviewed my comment and now think it's more likely that the worm is in attack mode and not in a struggle to survive against a hidden predator,because these worms are known to often detach their tails (up to about a third of worm's total length according to the books and I've seen an equally long worm drop about a quarter of its tail on a night dive decades ago at Port Stanvac just to south of Adelaide when it was attacked by various reef fish having been highlighted by our dive torches)...
David Muirhead ...(continued)...and the worm in this Edithburgh image appears intact and I would easily have seen any dropped rear segments as the visibility was excellent with little tidal current ,also there were no interested predatory fish species anywhere near the very active worm.So I have decided that the worm had the situation under control,just wish I knew what it was attacking under the substrate or perhaps in a prey species ' den or silty small crevice.My best guess would be one of the many mostly quite small Keeled Octopuses (O.berrima) which are common under this jetty,or maybe one of the bigger octopus species also common there e.g. Maori Octopus.Perhaps the worm was biding time keeping a firm grip on an octopus while waiting for its venom to take effect.
Intertidal bliss late on 16 Dec 2013 @ Ckga Bch SA
Intertidal bliss late on 16 Dec 2013 @ Ckga Bch SA
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Bream inshore shallows @ Btn Seacliff w odd background rock,14-02-2011
Bream inshore shallows @ Btn Seacliff w odd background rock,14-02-2011
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More inshore algae w bleached upper plants, 05-11-2013 Btn Sclff
More inshore algae w bleached upper plants, 05-11-2013 Btn Sclff
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Seahorse (Hippocampus breviceps) 24-02-2010 @hotspot Normanville SA
Seahorse (Hippocampus breviceps) 24-02-2010 @hotspot Normanville SA

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David Muirhead This is south Australia's commonest seahorse species and is quite variable in appearance.Often seen by divers under jetties and also a well known hitchhiking Syngnathid,e.g. on drift seaweed at or near the surface.
Seacliff’s inshore algal limit, depth about 0.5m 24-11-201
Seacliff’s inshore algal limit, depth about 0.5m 24-11-201
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Weedy Whitings, two, in SA
Weedy Whitings, two, in SA
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Caulocystis algae in 40cm depth 30-11-2010 Lady Bay SA
Caulocystis algae in 40cm depth 30-11-2010 Lady Bay SA
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Devil, Southern Blue (P.meleagris) juvenile posing, Kangaroo Head KI 24-04-201
Devil, Southern Blue (P.meleagris) juvenile posing, Kangaroo Head KI 24-04-201
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Compound Ascidian, yet another…24-04-2013 Kangaroo Hd KI
Compound Ascidian, yet another…24-04-2013 Kangaroo Hd KI
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Bream in Western River near mouth,nth coast KI SA 28-04-2013
Bream in Western River near mouth,nth coast KI SA 28-04-2013
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David Muirhead Taken in clean tea colored fresh water of the quite briskly out flowing Western River (really just a stream in world context but South Australia being the driest State of the driest inhabited continent we have to get by!),knee deep water and while intentionally submerging myself and my gear as a preliminary rinse following a scuba dive in the small cove right where the river meets the waves(Western River Cove)
David Muirhead Bream are a common estuary species around the southern half of Australia and are a popular recreational fishing target species.I saw many dozens of all sizes from small juveniles to adults in the 1-200 meters or so of the river that you must walk alongside or in to reach the beach from the car park.Plus a few yellow eye mullet,another popular target species common in our estuaries and inshore waters.
Striped Grunter school Wallaroo Jetty YP SA
Striped Grunter school Wallaroo Jetty YP SA

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Pygmy Squid (Sthn) on ascidian siphon Wallaroo Jetty 25-01-201
Pygmy Squid (Sthn) on ascidian siphon Wallaroo Jetty 25-01-201
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David Muirhead As I've perhaps noted on ealier image pinnings of this cute cephalopod,Idiosepius notoides is thought to be the world's smallest described species of squid,with adults seldom exceeding about 2.5 cm in total length.
Bugula dentata (bryozoan) Screwpile Jetty (Granite Is. Encounter Bay) 27-01-2012
Bugula dentata (bryozoan) Screwpile Jetty (Granite Is. Encounter Bay) 27-01-2012
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Sthn Calamari eats silverbelly fish(head gone )off Glenelg metro Adelaide SA
Sthn Calamari eats silverbelly fish(head gone )off Glenelg metro Adelaide SA
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Pipefish (Histogamphelus sp.); juvenile about 3cm long, Lady Bay 03-11-2013
Pipefish (Histogamphelus sp.); juvenile about 3cm long, Lady Bay 03-11-2013
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David Muirhead Histiogamphelus genus has just the two known species.This is probably H.briggsi(Briggs crested pipefish).Both species (the other is the Rhino pipefish ) are very common in south Australia but distributions overlap with Briggs extending from the east and rhinos from the west.Both species get quite long by pipefish standards and both mimic dead drift sea grass blades so are very cryptic in their usual inshore habitat where they roll and tumble along among sea grass detritus on mainly sandy substrates feeding on mysids mainly.
Fanworm @ Edithburg jetty 08-11-2012
Fanworm @ Edithburg jetty 08-11-2012
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Diminutive algal macro w Nikonos2, ET+framer; GSV SA
Diminutive algal macro w Nikonos2, ET+framer; GSV SA
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Sthn Blue Devil up close in ledge,nth cst KI SA
Sthn Blue Devil up close in ledge,nth cst KI SA
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Underrated understory reds Sir JBGp SG SA 13-05-2009
Underrated understory reds Sir JBGp SG SA 13-05-2009
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David Muirhead Southern Australia boasts world's peak marine macro alga speciation and particularly with regard to our red algae,unrivalled endemism combined with unrivalled speciation.Another reason why we use the phrase The Unique South ' to describe the incredible biodiversity and very high endemism rates across most major marine phyla,and sadly most of the world population remains unaware of this fact.

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